The 17 TV shows we’re still looking forward to in 2022

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The 17 TV shows we’re still looking forward to in 2022

By Louise Rugendyke

TV shows to look forward to in the second half of 2022 include (from left) The Crown, House of the Dragon and American Gigolo.

TV shows to look forward to in the second half of 2022 include (from left) The Crown, House of the Dragon and American Gigolo.Credit:Alex Bailey/Netflix, HBO/Foxtel, Stan

From big-budget blockbusters House of the Dragon and Lord of the Rings to home-grown comedies and returning favourites, here is our pick of the best TV to come in 2022.

Find out the next TV, streaming series and movies to add to your must-sees. Get The Watchlist delivered every Thursday.

A League of Their Own

You’d have to be dead inside to not love Penny Marshall’s 1992 comedy about the real-life All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. The film has now been turned into a series by Broad City’s Abbi Jacobson, who also stars, and Will Graham. Stepping into the curmudgeonly Tom Hanks role is the equally gruff but loveable Nick Offerman. Thankfully, the TV series, unlike the film, is a Madonna-free zone. Amazon Prime Video, August 12

She-Hulk: Attorney at Law

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Marvel’s TV forays into their broader universe have been mixed – Loki was a winner, The Falcon and the Winter Soldier was not – but this comedy looks so bonkers, I’m all in. Tatiana Maslany stars as Bruce Banner’s cousin, Jennifer Walters, a high-flying lawyer who gets very, very angry. The twist is Jennifer has no interest in being a superhero, as that’s an occupation best left to billionaires and orphans. Parts of the trailer look a little janky and there are the inevitable single lady jokes, but Maslany is always a strong performer and Mark Ruffalo is in it, so it’s worth a look. Disney+, August 17

Bad Sisters

The stars of Bad Sisters (from left) are Eve Hewson, Sharon Horgan, Anne-Marie Duff, Eva Birthistle and Sarah Greene.

The stars of Bad Sisters (from left) are Eve Hewson, Sharon Horgan, Anne-Marie Duff, Eva Birthistle and Sarah Greene.

You can sign me up for anything starring the very prolific and funny Sharon Horgan. This dark comedy follows the Garvey sisters, who are “bound together following the premature death of their parents”. It also stars the fab Anne-Marie Duff, Bono’s daughter, Eve Hewson, and an eye patch. (When googling the non-existent trailer, beware a similarly titled film about a nun acting creepily towards her brother). Apple TV+, August 18

House of the Dragon

When Game of Thrones ended in 2019, how much time did you spend thinking, “I wonder how it all started?” HBO reckons the answer to that question was, “A lot”, so they gambled on this prequel set 200 years before winter came and went in Westeros. It tracks the beginnings of the fall of the House of Targaryen, where sibling love was, um, a little intense. Starring dragons, Dr Who’s Matt Smith and young Australian actress Milly Alcock (who can also be seen opposite Tim Minchin again later this year in season two of Upright). Binge and Foxtel, August 22

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Andor

The Star Wars Industrial Complex rolls on, this time pumping out a prequel to the criminally underappreciated 2016 film Rogue One: A Stars Wars Story. It’s an origin story, focusing on rebel hero Cassian Andor, played by the charismatic Diego Luna and created by thriller specialist Tony Gilroy (Bourne et al). The supporting cast is stacked – including the deeply Swedish Stellan Skarsgard and the deeply British Fiona Shaw – and B2EMO could be the new droid you’re looking for. It’s a 12-episode series, and a second season has already been commissioned, so it’s already got more meat on its bones than the paper-thin Obi-Wan (come on, you know it wasn’t great). Disney+, August 31

The Bear

Critics and viewers have been salivating over this series ever since it premiered in the US in June. Jeremy Allen White plays Carmy Berzatto, a top chef who returns to Chicago to run his brother’s low-rent sandwich shop. Cue meat bought from a car boot, exploding toilets and enough sweat and grease to make you reconsider your lunch choices. Vulture ranked it No.1 on their list of stressful restaurant shows, calling it the “truest depiction of life spent working in a kitchen”. Disney+, August 31

Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power

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If the 1178-page book and the 557-minute movie trilogy didn’t satisfy all of your hobbit, elf, dwarf and orc needs, this prequel (yes, another one) should do the trick. Based on the backstory laid out by JRR Tolkien in the Lord of the Rings appendices, it covers the heroic legends of the fabled second age of Middle Earth’s history and features a young Elrond (Robert Aramayo) and Galadriel (Morfydd Clark), while Australian actor Markella Kavenagh plays the hobbit Elanor Brandyfoot. Filmed in New Zealand and running for five seasons, it’s rumoured to have cost more than $US1 billion. That’s a lot of pointy ears. Amazon Prime Video, September 1

The Handmaid’s Tale

Look, I know this isn’t the cheeriest of shows – grim doesn’t even begin to cover it – but with the overturning of the Roe v Wade abortion ruling in the US last month, this depiction of a world where women don’t have control over their bodies is more relevant than ever. And while the show has not been perfect, last season’s ending did provide some bloody closure (see ya, Fred!) for our heroine June (Elisabeth Moss) and provide a new path for the pregnant Serena (Yvonne Strahovski). Praise be, indeed. SBS, September 15

Tulsa King

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Sylvester Stallone sounds like he’s been gargling gravel in this crime drama, in which he plays Dwight Manfredi, a just-released-from-jail New York mafia boss who is sent to Oklahoma in disgrace. Once there, he has to start a new crew from scratch and, probably, get into a whole lotta trouble. Created by Yellowstone’s Taylor Sheridan, this has strong “TV you can watch with your dad” vibes all over it. It’s also Stallone’s first crack at a regular TV gig, and he co-stars alongside Garrett Hedlund. Paramount+, November 14

The White Lotus

Jennifer Coolidge returns as the chatty Tanya McQuoid in season two of The White Lotus.

Jennifer Coolidge returns as the chatty Tanya McQuoid in season two of The White Lotus.

If the image of Murray Bartlett squatting over a suitcase is still burned into your brain, pack your bag for season two of Mike White’s scorching satire of white privilege. A new cast, including Aubrey Plaza and Tom Hollander, have been filming in Sicily at the grand San Domenico Palace Hotel. And in even better news, the Emmy-nominated Jennifer Coolidge is returning as the desperately lonely but oh-so-chatty socialite Tanya. Binge, TBA

Heartbreak High

The cast of Netflix’s upcoming Heartbreak High reboot.

The cast of Netflix’s upcoming Heartbreak High reboot.Credit:Netflix

One of Netflix’s splashy local productions, this is a reboot of the ’90s classic that was, kind of, Australia’s answer to Degrassi Junior High. Filmed in Sydney and still set at Hartley High, the new season centres around Amerie (Ayesha Madon), who is caught in a public rift with her bestie, Harper (Asher Yasbincek). Netflix has promised that, much like the original, it will cover gritty issues relevant to today’s teens. So, MySpace, yeah? Netflix, TBA

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Colin From Accounts

The cast of Colin from Accounts, starring (from left) Tai Hara, Helen Thompson, Emma Harvie, Harriet Dyer, Patrick Brammall, Genevieve Hegney and Michael Logo.

The cast of Colin from Accounts, starring (from left) Tai Hara, Helen Thompson, Emma Harvie, Harriet Dyer, Patrick Brammall, Genevieve Hegney and Michael Logo.

This new eight-episode Australian comedy from husband and wife team Patrick Brammall and Harriet Dyer is about two flawed people who are brought together by a car accident and an injured dog. Filmed around Sydney’s inner west, it also stars the fab Genevieve Hegney and Helen Thompson. We’re giving it a go not only for its stars, but because one of its directors, Trent O’Donnell, has a knack for producing top-shelf comedy (see A Moody Christmas, No Activity, The Letdown, New Girl). Binge, TBA

Summer Love

Alison Bell and Annie Maynard star in the ABC’s anthology series Summer Love.

Alison Bell and Annie Maynard star in the ABC’s anthology series Summer Love.

Another Australian comedy from a reliable pair of hands, Wayne Hope and Robyn Butler, this anthology series is pitched as an antidote to pandemic blues. It follows eight sets of people renting the same holiday house (fingers crossed the condiment cupboard is in good order) and the travails that come with close-quarters holidays. Each episode is written by a different team, including Brammall and Dyer (see above), Miranda Tapsell, Kate Mulvany and comedian Nath Valvo. And in more good news, season two of Kitty Flanagan’s award-winning comedy Fisk also makes its return this year. ABC, TBA

The Crown

Elizabeth Debicki as Princess Diana in Season 5 of The Crown.

Elizabeth Debicki as Princess Diana in Season 5 of The Crown.Credit:Netflix

Just as the Queen wraps up her Platinum Jubilee year, and just as it was reported Prince Charles accepted €3 million in cash in bags from a Qatari politician (given straight to his charities, of course), in swaggers season five of The Crown to remind everyone about the bitter divorce of Charles and Diana and her untimely death. A new cast have stepped into the big-ticket roles, including Australian actor Elizabeth Debicki as Diana and The Wire’s Dominic West as Charles. Imelda Staunton, meanwhile, wears the actual crown as the new Queen Elizabeth. Juicy. Netflix, November TBA

Bali 2002

Based on the October 12, 2002 terrorist bombings at Kuta Beach and the US Consulate, which killed 202 people, including 88 Australians, this big ticket local production aims to tell the story of those who were there when it happened and the search for justice. Based on first-hand accounts of survivors, rescuers and families, it stars Richard Roxburgh, Rachel Griffiths, Ewen Leslie, Sean Keenan and Arkas Das. Stan*, TBA

American Gigolo

The internet has been thirsting over Jon Bernthal since he starred in We Own This City, David Simon’s critically acclaimed gritty drama about a corrupt Baltimore police department, earlier this year. Well, you can count on the thirst continuing, as Bernthal takes on the role of former male escort Julian Kaye, made famous by Richard Gere in the 1980 film of the same name. Set in the present day, the show follows Julian after he is released from prison after serving 15 years for a murder he, of course, did not commit. Rosie O’Donnell also pops up as a detective attempting to uncover the truth. Stan, TBA

Ted Lasso

Brendan Hunt as Coach Beard and Jason Sudeikis as Ted Lasso in the hit TV show.

Brendan Hunt as Coach Beard and Jason Sudeikis as Ted Lasso in the hit TV show. Credit:Apple TV+

This is a bit of a Hail Mary, with no confirmation yet Jason Sudeikis’s feel-good series will return this year. My guess is based on the fact the last two seasons premiered in August 2020 and July 2021, they’ve been filming in London over the last few months and the very Lassoian concept of hope. Only three seasons of the award-winning show have been confirmed, which means the loose ends of season two - Evil Nate! Heartbroken Roy! Independent Keeley! In love Rebecca! Single Ted! – are ready to be wrapped up. me? All I want is that damn biscuit recipe. Apple TV+, TBA

* Stan is owned by Nine, publisher of The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

Find out the next TV, streaming series and movies to add to your must-sees. Get The Watchlist delivered every Thursday.

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